Degraded Willow Wetland in Big Meadows

Within the Klamath Mountains and throughout the West one can find large, one-half acre and larger dense stands of willows along streams and over wetlands. Large, dense willow stands shade streams, protect the wetlands beneath and provide breeding habitat for Willow flycatchers,  Lazuli buntings, Yellow warblers and other birds. Unfortunately, cattle, elk, and deer all …

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Black Meadows Fragmented Willow Stands

While sheep and even goats are grazed on our public lands, most public land grazing in Northern California is by cattle. When cattle are not herded regularly to provide a respite from grazing by rotating the herd among the various meadows that provide forage, the herd will find a location within the grazing allotment which …

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Another Trashed Spring

By the end of 2014 volunteers with the Project to Reform Public Land Grazing had monitored conditions on 13 grazing allotments within the Klamath and Rogue-Siskiyou National Forests. Some of these areas have been monitored for 5 years. A grazing allotment is an area of national forest land which the Forest Service has designated for …

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Cattle Manure in Taylor Lake

Taylor Lake is a popular recreation site within Northern California’s Russian Peak Wilderness. It is the only wilderness lake on the Klamath National Forest which has wheelchair trail access. Only one-half mile from the trailhead, Taylor Lake was also a popular swimming and picnic site for families. Years ago, taxpayer funds paid for a new …

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Degraded Riparian Area in Stones Valley

This photo shows willows along a stream in Stones Valley in the Klamath National Forest’s Marble Mountain Wilderness. Stones Valley’s wet meadows are one of the headwaters of Grider Creek, a key salmon stream which enters the Klamath River near the town of Seiad Valley. To get to the tender grass along headwater streams, cattle …

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WHAT'S NEW

Siskiyou Crest Grazing Report

Documenting grazing-caused degradation on portions of the Klamath and Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forests.

Carter Meadows Grazing Report

Documenting grazing-caused degradation within the Trinity Alps Wilderness

Since its inception in 2009, The Project to Reform Public Land grazing in Northern California has utilized volunteers and interns to monitor grazing on-the-ground within Northern California wilderness and other public lands. All on-the-ground monitoring, including monitoring conducted by Project staff, is 100% volunteer. If you can carry a pack and hike off-trail, you can monitor how grazing is managed on Northern California's public lands. And, with a little bit of training and support, you can monitor and document the negative results of poorly managed public land grazing on your own or with friends. Learn more about how you can get involved at this link.

You can help reform the manner in which livestock grazing is managed on our public lands. The "Get Involved" link above links to a page presenting several ways you can get involved as a volunteer or monitoring public land grazing on your own or with friends. There is also a link by which you can also help with a donation in support of the Project's work. This link will take you to the donation page for the Environmental Protection Information Center; EPIC is one of three organizations sponsoring the Project. Please be sure to note that your donation is for the Grazing Reform Project. We will use all donations to advance our #1 objective: Assuring that public land grazing in Northern California is either managed properly and responsibly or ended.

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